Invasive Species Mapping

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Have you encountered invasive species in Prince Edward County? County staff want to hear from you!

Invasive species are a growing problem in the province of Ontario. Invasive plants and insects have the potential to threaten or displace native species and can cause severe damage to ecosystems. In some cases, invasive species can even physically harm humans as well.

The County is collecting data on where these invasive species can be found in Prince Edward County. We need the help of the public to better understand the distribution of these species within or community. We are asking that residents report invasive species that you encounter to us using the mapping tool on this site.

Data collected here will help the County and our partners track the spread of invasive species in our communities. This data will also help us understand the extent of the problem and will assist with addressing the issue. This data may also assist our partners like Quinte Conservation Authority, other municipalities, or the province, with developing larger regional mitigation efforts.


Invasive plants have a high potential to spread if disposed of improperly. For this reason, invasive plants should not be disposed of in the green bin or along with regular leaf and yard waste. Invasive plants should instead be bagged and disposed of along with your regular household garbage.


Use the map below to help identify the type and location of invasive species that you see within The County. These species include:


An emerald ash borer seen close up on tree bark. Emerald Ash Borer (EAB):

A small green beetle that feeds on the phloem, cambium, and xylem of Ash trees, eventually leading to the death of the host tree. The presence of EAB in a tree can be identified by distinct "D" shaped holes in the trunk and limbs of a tree. Adults are narrow and 8-14 millimeters; they are metallic green with bright red patches under their wings.
Learn more about the Emerald Ash Borer.



A Lymantria Dispar Dispar moth up close.

Lymantria Dispar Dispar (formerly known as "Gypsy Moth")

The LDD moth is a small white to brown moth that consumes the leaves of a variety of tree species. During population booms, these moths can be responsible for severe defoliation, that can lead to tree death. They are up to six centimeters long with five pairs of blue dots and six pairs of red dots running down their back and are covered in long light hairs.
Learn more about the LDD moth.



Wild parsnip flowers up close.

Wild Parsnip

Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) is a member of the carrot/parsley family. The plant can form dense stands and spreads quickly in disturbed areas. Like giant hogweed and other members of the carrot family, it produces sap containing chemicals that can cause human skin to react to sunlight, resulting in intense burns, rashes or blisters. Able to grow up to 1.5 meters tall with compound leaves arranged in pairs. Avoid Contact.
Learn more about Wild Parsnip.



Giant hogweed flowers up close.

Giant Hogweed

Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is a perennial plant and a member of the carrot family. The clear watery sap of giant hogweed contains toxins that can cause severe dermatitis (inflammation of the skin). You can get severe burns if you get the sap on your skin and the skin is then exposed to sunlight. The plant can be 2 to 5.5 meters tall with broad leaves that are deeply lobed and serrated. Avoid Contact.
Learn more about Giant Hogweed.



Close up of Japanese Knotweed leaves.

Japanese Knotweed

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is an aggressive semi-woody perennial plant that is native to eastern Asia. Japanese knotweed is often mistaken for bamboo; however it is easily distinguished by its broad leaves and its ability to survive Ontario winters. Japanese knotweed is especially persistent due to its vigorous root system, which can spread nearly 10 meters from the parent stem and grow through concrete and asphalt.
Learn more about Japanese Knotweed.



Dog Strangling Vine

The name “Dog-strangling Vine” refers to two invasive plants native to Eurasia– black swallowwort and pale swallowwort. Dog-strangling Vine prefers open sunny areas, but can grow well in light shade. It grows aggressively up to two meters high by wrapping itself around trees and other plants, or trailing along the ground. Dense patches of the vine can “strangle” plants and small trees.
Learn more about Dog Strangling Vine.



Invasive Phragmites

Invasive Phragmites (European Common Reed) is an invasive plant causing damage to Ontario’s biodiversity, wetlands and beaches. Invasive Phragmites spreads quickly and out-competes native species for water and nutrients. It releases toxins from its roots into the soil to hinder the growth of and kill surrounding plants. While it prefers areas of standing water, its roots can grow to extreme lengths, allowing it to survive in relatively dry areas.
Learn more about Invasive Phragmites.



Garlic Mustard

Garlic mustard is an invasive edible herb native to Europe that appears in the early spring. It has a strong, distinctive smell similar to garlic and is one of Ontario’s most aggressive forest invaders. Garlic mustard has two distinct life stages. In the first year, it grows only a cluster of leaves shaped like a rosette, while a strong root system develops. Plants that survive the winter produce flowers and hundreds of seeds in their second year. Second-year plants grow a stem 0.3 to 1.2 metres high with triangular, alternate, sharply toothed leaves. Second-year plants produce white flowers with four small petals in May. Learn more about garlic mustard.


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is a non-native, tiny (less than 1.5mm), aphid-like insect that attacks and kills hemlock trees. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) attaches to the branch and at the base of needles extracting nutrients and sap. Infestations can be identified by the white 'woolly' sacs at the base of hemlock needles on current-year twigs.
Learn more about Hemlock Woolly Adelgid.




Have you encountered invasive species in Prince Edward County? County staff want to hear from you!

Invasive species are a growing problem in the province of Ontario. Invasive plants and insects have the potential to threaten or displace native species and can cause severe damage to ecosystems. In some cases, invasive species can even physically harm humans as well.

The County is collecting data on where these invasive species can be found in Prince Edward County. We need the help of the public to better understand the distribution of these species within or community. We are asking that residents report invasive species that you encounter to us using the mapping tool on this site.

Data collected here will help the County and our partners track the spread of invasive species in our communities. This data will also help us understand the extent of the problem and will assist with addressing the issue. This data may also assist our partners like Quinte Conservation Authority, other municipalities, or the province, with developing larger regional mitigation efforts.


Invasive plants have a high potential to spread if disposed of improperly. For this reason, invasive plants should not be disposed of in the green bin or along with regular leaf and yard waste. Invasive plants should instead be bagged and disposed of along with your regular household garbage.


Use the map below to help identify the type and location of invasive species that you see within The County. These species include:


An emerald ash borer seen close up on tree bark. Emerald Ash Borer (EAB):

A small green beetle that feeds on the phloem, cambium, and xylem of Ash trees, eventually leading to the death of the host tree. The presence of EAB in a tree can be identified by distinct "D" shaped holes in the trunk and limbs of a tree. Adults are narrow and 8-14 millimeters; they are metallic green with bright red patches under their wings.
Learn more about the Emerald Ash Borer.



A Lymantria Dispar Dispar moth up close.

Lymantria Dispar Dispar (formerly known as "Gypsy Moth")

The LDD moth is a small white to brown moth that consumes the leaves of a variety of tree species. During population booms, these moths can be responsible for severe defoliation, that can lead to tree death. They are up to six centimeters long with five pairs of blue dots and six pairs of red dots running down their back and are covered in long light hairs.
Learn more about the LDD moth.



Wild parsnip flowers up close.

Wild Parsnip

Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) is a member of the carrot/parsley family. The plant can form dense stands and spreads quickly in disturbed areas. Like giant hogweed and other members of the carrot family, it produces sap containing chemicals that can cause human skin to react to sunlight, resulting in intense burns, rashes or blisters. Able to grow up to 1.5 meters tall with compound leaves arranged in pairs. Avoid Contact.
Learn more about Wild Parsnip.



Giant hogweed flowers up close.

Giant Hogweed

Giant Hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) is a perennial plant and a member of the carrot family. The clear watery sap of giant hogweed contains toxins that can cause severe dermatitis (inflammation of the skin). You can get severe burns if you get the sap on your skin and the skin is then exposed to sunlight. The plant can be 2 to 5.5 meters tall with broad leaves that are deeply lobed and serrated. Avoid Contact.
Learn more about Giant Hogweed.



Close up of Japanese Knotweed leaves.

Japanese Knotweed

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is an aggressive semi-woody perennial plant that is native to eastern Asia. Japanese knotweed is often mistaken for bamboo; however it is easily distinguished by its broad leaves and its ability to survive Ontario winters. Japanese knotweed is especially persistent due to its vigorous root system, which can spread nearly 10 meters from the parent stem and grow through concrete and asphalt.
Learn more about Japanese Knotweed.



Dog Strangling Vine

The name “Dog-strangling Vine” refers to two invasive plants native to Eurasia– black swallowwort and pale swallowwort. Dog-strangling Vine prefers open sunny areas, but can grow well in light shade. It grows aggressively up to two meters high by wrapping itself around trees and other plants, or trailing along the ground. Dense patches of the vine can “strangle” plants and small trees.
Learn more about Dog Strangling Vine.



Invasive Phragmites

Invasive Phragmites (European Common Reed) is an invasive plant causing damage to Ontario’s biodiversity, wetlands and beaches. Invasive Phragmites spreads quickly and out-competes native species for water and nutrients. It releases toxins from its roots into the soil to hinder the growth of and kill surrounding plants. While it prefers areas of standing water, its roots can grow to extreme lengths, allowing it to survive in relatively dry areas.
Learn more about Invasive Phragmites.



Garlic Mustard

Garlic mustard is an invasive edible herb native to Europe that appears in the early spring. It has a strong, distinctive smell similar to garlic and is one of Ontario’s most aggressive forest invaders. Garlic mustard has two distinct life stages. In the first year, it grows only a cluster of leaves shaped like a rosette, while a strong root system develops. Plants that survive the winter produce flowers and hundreds of seeds in their second year. Second-year plants grow a stem 0.3 to 1.2 metres high with triangular, alternate, sharply toothed leaves. Second-year plants produce white flowers with four small petals in May. Learn more about garlic mustard.


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is a non-native, tiny (less than 1.5mm), aphid-like insect that attacks and kills hemlock trees. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) attaches to the branch and at the base of needles extracting nutrients and sap. Infestations can be identified by the white 'woolly' sacs at the base of hemlock needles on current-year twigs.
Learn more about Hemlock Woolly Adelgid.




Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Invasive Species Mapping

10 months

Place a "pin" on the map where you have seen invasive species in The County.  Click the + icon to the left to create a pin. Use the +/- control in the bottom right of the map to zoom in or out on your location.

For assistance with identifying invasive species, visit the Invasive Species Centre species profile page.

For each pin you place, you have the option to upload a photo and/or include comments.

Placing a pin is not a work order and will not result in immediate or specific action. This information will help County staff understand more about the presence of invasive plants and insects in our area. This data will be used in combination with other data sources to help us develop an informed response to invasive species. 

If you need urgent assistance (i.e. a tree has become a hazard due to invasives or human health is at risk due to invasives on County property), please contact Customer Service at 613.476.2148 extension 1023 or email info@pecounty.on.ca.


Page last updated: 30 Nov 2022, 06:10 PM