"Holding Court" John A. Macdonald Statue

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Public feedback for this project has now closed.

The “Holding Court” John A. Macdonald statue will remain in its current location on Picton Main Street following a decision by County Council at a special meeting on Tuesday, November 17. Read more on the County of Prince Edward website.


The Sir John A. Macdonald statue "Holding Court" was returned from storage to Picton Main Street at the Picton Library in early 2020 (after its original installation in 2015). Its return was a catalyst for conversation about Sir John A. Macdonald's past, within the broader context of colonialism. From this conversation

Public feedback for this project has now closed.

The “Holding Court” John A. Macdonald statue will remain in its current location on Picton Main Street following a decision by County Council at a special meeting on Tuesday, November 17. Read more on the County of Prince Edward website.


The Sir John A. Macdonald statue "Holding Court" was returned from storage to Picton Main Street at the Picton Library in early 2020 (after its original installation in 2015). Its return was a catalyst for conversation about Sir John A. Macdonald's past, within the broader context of colonialism. From this conversation came the Prince Edward County Public Library's Speaker Series (Dr. Niigan Sinclair, Sarah Midanik, Kateri Lucier-Laboucan and Calvin Brook) addressed the need for projects which aim to restore Indigenous presence within communities, among other things. Other speakers were scheduled into March, but the COVID-19 pandemic caused the series to be cancelled due to public health measures.


The "Holding Court" Statue Working Group" was formed under the Prince Edward Heritage Advisory Committee (PEHAC) to conduct public consultation, research and ultimately to make recommendations to PEHAC about the future of the "Holding Court" statue. Their mandate is to advise PEHAC in their recommendation to Council in regard to the current installation in Picton of the "Holding Court" Sir John A. Macdonald statue.


Their goals are as follows:


  1. Follow the scope of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's 10 Principles of Truth and Reconciliation
  2. Conduct research, carry out public consultation and prepare documentation, as necessary, to assist PEHAC in their recommendation to assist Council in their decision on the future of the Holding Court" statue
  3. Assist staff to prepare a report to PEHAC and ultimately Council by December 1, 2020, or as soon as feasible, outlining a recommendation for the future of the "Holding Court" statue.

Through this Have Your Say public engagement page, the Working Group will share information relevant to the public discussion, including their terms of reference, the 10 Principles of Truth and Reconciliation, and other documents (located in "Resources").


The Working Group would like to hear your views on what should be done with the "Holding Court" statue.


Individuals and organizations can tell the Working Group their views:


  • Directly (in person or virtually) by presenting deputations (see "Deputation Guidelines" for more information on making public deputations)
  • During a Town Hall event planned for Fall 2020.
  • Via email to: ecowan@pecounty.on.ca
  • By fax at: 613.476.5727
  • By mail to: The "Holding Court” Statue Working Group, c/o County of Prince Edward, 332 Main Street, Picton, ON, K0K 2T0.

Please note that deputations and all comments are public.


Please explore the feedback options available on this page (below) to give your feedback. Register for updates to this page to get notified when new consultation tools are added as the Working Group progresses towards their goal.


In the words of Dr. Niigan Sinclair during his address in Picton, "What do we do with this history we have inherited together?"

Tell us what the Holding Court statue means to you?

Thank you for sharing your story with us.
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Disrespectful and misleading

    by Golshan Abdmoulaie, about 1 year ago

    The legislative course that this man took against Indigenous people of this land is horrendous. This statue is a major dishonor and disrespect to all of us, in particular to Indigenous folks. It is time we start telling the truth about history, If we humans do not start facing our violent past we cannot evolve into a peaceful future.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    In todays world

    by Diane Denyes-Wenn, about 1 year ago
    This statue does not give me pleasure or pain, unlike others who have suffered by the action of our first prime minister. Maybe it is time we honour and condem our history without money being spent wastefully on statues in public places. Time for change.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Take it down! It's not history!

    by LFraser, about 1 year ago
    Stop glorifying racists like John A Macdonald with public statues.


    It's NOT history. Its glorification of a horribly racist man who is responsible for genocide. We dont need statues of him or any others like him.

    History is being made NOW

    Following Montréal, the writing is on the wall. Take them down! Or the will of the people will

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Insulting

    by Amalie Churchill, about 1 year ago
    This statue glorifies a man whose ideologies, while common but not unanimous, led to him making decisions in government that directly contributed to genocide, death and immeasurable suffering. To keep this man's image prominent in our community is to send a message to Indigenous people that their culture is inferior. It perpetuates harmful beliefs which to this day cause harm and suffering. Its immediate removal is the only logical conclusion.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Removing the statue is the first step County Council needs to take

    by Elis ziegler, about 1 year ago
    Thank you for giving the opportunity to contribute the the discussion, and hopefully decision, on the placement of the Holding Court statue. Canada, as a white dominant society and government, is at another crossroads in its evolution - which is the capacity to address the consequences of its actions. This applies to all levels of government, which must walk the walk. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommendations are clear, our role in the harm done to the first inhabitants of this land and our collective conscience all say we must actively take new steps toward recognizing our past. County residents... Continue reading
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Discovering our shared history together

    by Scott Shortly, about 1 year ago

    To the "Holding Court" Statue Working Group, or To Whom it May Concern,

    I would like to acknowledge and honour the land on which we reside and occupy as part of the traditional territories of the Huron Wendat, Anishinaabek and Haudenosaunee Peoples. These Indigenous Nations, agreed to mutually sharing obligations and responsibilities as stewards of the land and water which is protected by the “Dish With One Spoon” wampum agreement. Today these responsibilities and obligations extend to all Peoples. These lands are steeped in rich Indigenous history, traditions and modern cultures that are proud and vibrant.

    (I offer this opening... Continue reading

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Get rid of it

    by James Sessford, about 1 year ago
    Maybe stick it in a museum if people are concerned with preserving history (we already have libraries and public education for that purpose though). His misdeeds should not be glorified with a public statue.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Keep it

    by Lisa Conley, about 1 year ago
    Its a part of history and you cant toss history down the garbage shoot. We live and learn. Keep it.
  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Asking the wrong people

    by Arwyn Carpenter, about 1 year ago
    I've read the T & R Commision's 10 Principals of Truth and Reconciliation. This statue does not serve the lives of FNIM people. Who do you think is going to answer this question? Do you think that Anishnaabe people whose were harmed directly, and who have inherited the trauma caused by the Indian Act are going to have their voices count in this discussion? I really wish it wasn't up to white people to decide what happens here.

    Thank you Miigwetch,

    Arwyn Carpenter

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Time for a change

    by Andrew Schwab, about 1 year ago
    I think this statue represents the end of an era - or at least, I hope it does. Statues celebrate a person - they don't teach history. And in this case, the statue celebrates the life's work of a vicious racist who sought the extermination of Indigenous people people across Turtle Island. That this genocide was to further the cause of creating a whitewashed, colonial country on stolen land does nothing to justify his actions, and if anything further condemns the colonial nature of Canada's history.


    We owe it to Indigenous survivors of state-sponsored genocide to honour their pain, not... Continue reading

Page last updated: 18 November 2020, 14:44